Frequently Asked Questions

The most economical way to lighten your homes is here. Solar Power is the Power of the FUTURE

1. What are Solar Photovoltaic and Solar Water Heating?

There are two main types of solar energy systems. Solar energy systems that turn sunlight into electricity are referred to as solar Photovoltaic (SPV or PV). The other type uses the sun's radiation to heat water or other liquids, and these are known as Solar Thermal (ST) or Solar Water Heater (SWH).

2. Are there any government incentives available to make solar more affordable?

Yes. The Union Government is providing several incentives to encourage production of Solar Energy at Household level. Sereral banks plan to offer loans to homes and businesses for solar-power systems as the country seeks to avoid a repeat of the July blackout that affected half the nation’s 1.2 billion people. In July this year, the Reserve Bank of India finally decided to act on the recommendation of a committee set up under the chairmanship of MV Nair (former chairman and managing director of Union Bank of India). The RBI allowed loans given to individuals to set up off-grid solar and other renewable energy solutions for households as priority sector loans. The move allows individuals to get low-interest loans for setting up solar and other renewable energy generations capacities. This could give a major fillip to small solar power generation in villages which in turn would mean savings for us. Since solar power is one time investment and again banks are providing loans for this. Once we set up the system, instantly we receive returns.

3. I keep hearing that massive breakthroughs in solar are 'just around the corner' - should I wait?

Solar technology that is available today has its roots in research and design that has been building for decades. In our 25 year history, these breakthroughs have always been 'just around the corner'! Solar electricity and solar hot water is like all evolving technologies and will continue to get better and cheaper over time. Currently the Indian Government is offering financial incentives via the Bank Loan Schemes, to assist home owner invest in solar. The financial support that this scheme offers is planned to reduce over time in line with the cost of solar technology.

4. What is the lifetime of the panels?

Panels should provide several decades of clean, free and renewable electricity. Our panels come with performance and efficiency warranties.

5. How long does an installation take?

In most cases, the installation of your solar system will take just one day. For solar systems larger than 3 kW, additional days may be required.

6. Which direction should my roof face for the best performance?

In the northern hemisphere, a South facing solar array will have the greatest sun exposure throughout the year. Therefore any roof facing between South-East and South-West will provide the best result within 5 - 10% of optimum output depending on your latitude. If you are not sure of the orientation or size of your roof, please call us at Solar Kiran so that we may assist you with an estimate.

7. Most solar panels I have seen are on pitched roofs, what about flat roofs?

Solar panels collect more sunlight and produce more energy when they are aligned with the sun. For this reason it is easier to install on a pitched roof. If your roof is flat, or very low in pitch, we can supply and install a 'frame' that will elevate the panels to catch more sun. These frames cost a little extra, which is justified through bigger savings from your solar power system.

8. How much room is required for the inverter?

Inverters come in a range of shapes and sizes. The typical dimensions are 40cm (wide) x 30cm (high) x 20cm (deep). The inverter is normally placed in the vicinity of your switchboard and meter box. There is a degree of flexibility as to where exactly the inverter is installed, so please speak to your installer to select your preferred location. There is no extra charge for installing the inverter in your chosen location unless it involves an unusually long run of cable.

9. How much of my electricity consumption can I cover with a solar energy system?

Electricity consumption is varied and there are many factors to consider when making these calculations. We can assist you in examining your electricity usage and recommending an appropriate size to meet your requirements. The vast majority of households will see a significant benefit from installing just a 1.5kW solar PV system.

10. What happens when I'm not generating as much electricity as I am using?

Your solar electricity system works right alongside your normal mains electricity supply. When your house requires more electricity than your solar system is producing, the shortfall is provided by the power grid. Since your solar electricity is free, you only pay for the small amount of electricity you draw from the power grid.

11. What happens to the excess electricity I produce during the day?

With any size of solar system, there will be times when your household does not require very much electricity and you will have a surplus being generated. In this scenario, the surplus electricity can be stored in a battery. This extra power can be used during night. So, essentially if you have the right solar power system, then you don't have to pay a single penny to the power board.

12. How much of my electricity consumption can I cover with a solar hot water system?

Electricity consumption is varied and there are many factors to consider when making these calculations. We can assist you in examining your electricity usage and recommending an appropriate size to meet your requirements. The vast majority of households will see a significant benefit from installing 100L solar water heating system in their home.

13. I have heard that solar hot water systems leak some water. Is this normal?

It is normal for a solar hot water system to discharge a small quantity of water while in operation. This confirms the solar hot water system is working and heating the water. Each system is fitted with an anti-frost valve. To prevent freezing and risk damaging the solar collector, it will discharge water 5 degrees and below. The colder the solar panel, the more it will discharge. Another area of water discharge is via the condensation drain, which is located at the base of the system.